Ang Mo Kio West | Home Tourist Photo Essay 1

Ang Mo Kio Evening PicturesAng Mo Kio Evening Pictures



Exploring night time Ang Mo Kio West, and childhood memories.


Foreword

In this new series, I’d be exploring local neighbourhoods of Singapore i.e. being a “home tourist.” I wouldn’t be featuring must-eats, must-buys, or must-visits, though. Instead, Pictures in this essay and all to come will strictly feature only night-time residential Singapore.

As for the reasons behind this series, well, couple of weeks ago, I was feeling OH SO SLUGGISH. I had a pile of work to attend to but I just couldn’t get down to it. Neither did I feel like heading to town, or watching a movie, or playing any video game.

In the end, I dragged myself to Bishan Junction 8. After dinner, I walked all the way from Junction 8 to Toa Payoh Central, meandering through the oldest parts of TPY before reaching the town central. I would never have guessed it but that 90-minute sweaty walk was surprising enjoyable. It was in a subdued way, nostalgic, mellow, and even sentimental.

Ever since, I’ve been making these residential estate walks every Friday. (It’s good exercise, btw). Naturally, it didn’t take long for me to decide that I can squeeze a few blog posts out of these excursions. After all, aren’t our residential estates one of the architectural highlights of the country?

Ang Mo Kio West (Friday Evening, 7pm to 9pm)

Two things before I begin.

Firstly, I think the name “Ang Mo Kio West” is seldom used nowadays. Most Singaporeans just call the area by its full name or by the constituency designations. For this walk, I kept to the parts of the estate “west” of the North-South MRT line. My primary route was along Ang Mo Kio Avenue 3, Ang Mo Kio Street 22, and finally, Ang Mo Kio Avenue 4.

Secondly, I used to live here. Yeah … I lived in AMK for eight years between ages 4 and 12. I also attended kindergarten and primary school here. My route correspondingly sliced through the precinct where I used to live before ending near where my primary school formerly was. In a way, I was tracing my previous daily journeys to school all those years ago with this walk. It’s intentional, if you’re wondering. I haven’t returned for over ten years and I was curious to see how many of the old shops are still there.



51@AMK at Ang Mo Kio Town Centre
My walk began at the town centre. Doesn’t look the case in this picture but it was actually pretty crowded. Also, [email protected] used to be … a cinema! Ang Mo Kio Cinema, if I’m not wrong. After they went out of business, the building was home to an arcade. I remember the latter because I ever fought with an Ah Beng over an Operation Wolf game in the arcade.
Ang Mo Kio Town Centre.
One of the shopping thoroughfares of Ang Mo Kio Town Centre. HDB town centres used to be sprawling, before they got smaller and smaller. Nowadays, I think they are, err, primarily shopping malls.
Ang Mo Kio Avenue 6 evening shot.
View from Ang Mo Kio Avenue 6 as I strolled down it. I like the view of those dense, newer flats in the distance. There’s a mild … Coruscant feeling.
HDB Blocks in Singapore.
Serene HDB flats and a playground. The surroundings became quiet once I was away from the town centre and AMK Hub.
Old HDB Furniture Shop in Ang Mo Kio.
A furniture shop with a very 80s shopfront. Check out that sign!
Keban Baru Food Centre.
Keban Baru Food Centre. Things were more or less lively around it. However, many of the food stalls were closed.
Ang Mo Kio HDB Estate Evening View.
I shot this from right outside my old home. The immediately area hasn’t changed that much. However, none of those buildings in the distance existed back then. It was all forested land.
HDB Residents' Corner
A “Residents’ Corner.” This would feel meaningless to you, but right here was where my mother used to wait for me to return from school. (As in, for me to get off the school bus)
Singapore HDB Block in the evening.
Block 111. My family used to patronise the coffee shop next to this block for dinner. (There was a great Chicken Rice stall)
Kebun Baru Community Club, Singapore.
Enthusiastic “aunties” doing their Friday evening exercises at Kebun Baru Community Club.
Mayflower Market and Food Centre SG50 Mural
Came across this SG50 mural at Mayflower Market and Food Centre. I’m usually not into such “nation-building” things, but I think this one is well done. It incorporates several icons of Ang Mo Kio and Singapore, as well as slyly reminds that the name “Ang Mo Kio” is believed by many Singaporeans to mean tomato.
Ang Mo Kio HDB Block Mural.
Another mural. This one at one of the 600++ blocks isn’t as impressive as the one above. However, I believe the dude in it is wearing Anderson JC colours. Anderson JC, as in, my JC. We did use to go around the estate collecting newspapers for recycling.
Blk 631 Ang Mo Kio coffee shop.
The beautifully renovated coffee shop at Block 631. This is really a far, FAR cry from the coffee shops in the 80s.
Ang Mo Kio Block 632A
I have something childish to reveal. 😛 I used to be FASCINATED by these hexagonal shops; there were several in the town centre too. I have no idea why but as a kid, I found these uniquely shaped shops exotic. I even dreamt about someday owning one.
Ang Mo Kio Chu Sheng Temple
Last but not least, Ang Mo Kio West Chu Sheng Temple. This has been here since the 80s, if I’m not wrong. Going by the temple’s profile on Google Maps, it enjoys a large number of devotees too.


All pictures were shot with my LG V40. The V40 is not the best camera phone for 2019, according to many. But for me, it more than good enough.


Read my other Home Tourist photo essays.

Summary
Ang Mo Kio West Evening Walk
Article Name
Ang Mo Kio West Evening Walk
Description
Ang Mo Kio West evening and night time pictures. These were taken with my LG V40 during one of my weekly Friday evening walks.
Author


The Geek
the authorThe Geek
Geek, gamer, writer, movie lover, photographer, and occasional graphic artist. I like to consider myself a one-stop content creator of sorts. But the truth is, I obsess over too many hobbies.

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